Core Faculty

  • Sensei Robert Chodo Campbell

    Sensei Robert Chodo Campbell co-founded the New York Zen Center for Contemplative Care. The organization delivers contemplative approaches to care through education, direct service and meditation practice. In order to bring the work to a broader audience, he co-developed the Foundations in Contemplative Care Training Program. Chodo is part of the core faculty for the Buddhist Track in the Master in Pastoral Care and Counseling at NYZCCC’s education partner, New York Theological Seminary. He teaches in the University of Arizona Medical School’s Center for Integrative Medicine’s Integrative Medicine Fellowship. Chodo is a dynamic, earthy, and visionary leader and teacher, Chodo has travelled extensively in the U.S teaching in various institutions as well as bearing witness to the suffering of HIV/AIDS in Zimbabwe and South Africa. His public programs have introduced thousands to the practices of mindful and compassionate care of the living and dying. 30,000 people listen to his podcasts each year. His passion lies in bereavement counseling and advocating for change in the way our healthcare institutions work with the dying.  He is a Senior Soto Zen priest and Soto Zen Teacher.

  • Sensei Koshin Paley Ellison, MFA, LMSW, DMIN

    Sensei Koshin Paley Ellison, MFA, LMSW, DMIN, cofounded the New York Zen Center for Contemplative Care, the first Zen-based organization to offer fully accredited ACPE clinical chaplaincy training in America, which delivers contemplative approaches to care through education, direct service, and meditation practice. Paley Ellison is the academic advisor for the Buddhist students in the Master in Pastoral Care and Counseling program at NYZCCC’s education partner, New York Theological Seminary. He has served as the co-director of Contemplative Care Services for the Department of Integrative Medicine and as the chaplaincy supervisor for the Pain and Palliative Care Department at Mount Sinai Beth Israel Medical Center, where he also served on the Medical Ethics Committee. He is currently on the faculty of the University of Arizona Medical School’s Center for Integrative Medicine’s Integrative Medicine Fellowship, and he is a visiting professor at the McGovern Center for Humanities and Ethics, of the University of Texas Health Science Center of Houston Medical School.

    Paley Ellison is a dynamic, original, and visionary leader and teacher. Koshin is the co-editor of Awake at the Bedside: Contemplative Teachings on Palliative and End of Life Care (Wisdom Publications, 2016). He received his clinical training at Mount Sinai Beth Israel Medical Center and the Jungian Psychoanalytic Association. He began is formal Zen training in 1987, and he delightfully continues to study with Dorothy Dai En Friedman, Zen teacher in the White Plum Soto Zen Lineage. He is a senior Zen monk, Soto Zen teacher, ACPE supervisor, and Jungian psychotherapist.


Mentors

  • Melissa Amdur, LMSW

    Melissa Amdur has a Master's Degree in social work and began her training with NYZCCC in 2011 in the Foundations Program, seeking to deepen her therapeutic practice.  During her subsequent CPE training, she has been a member of the palliative care teams at Beth Israel Medical Center and at Mount Sinai Hospital.  She will finish her fourth unit of CPE in the Spring of 2015 and will continue developing her Buddhist practice.  Melissa has worked as a writer, editor, and teacher of English composition at Hunter College and the Borough of Manhattan Community College.  She brings 20 years of individual and group psychotherapeutic work to this experience.  Melissa lives in Brooklyn with her husband Richard and daughter Olive.

  • Barbara Ende, MA

    Barbara Doshin Ende lives in northern Westchester with her husband, Pat, and their various animals. She came to Foundations and then CPE as a way to round out her professional experience working in healthcare. Dōshin had a thirty three career working in clinical services for the disabled and presently is a guardianship advocate for people with developmental disabilities. She has an MA in psychology and completed the MA in Pastoral Care and Counseling at New York Theological Seminary through the Zen Center.  After six years of clinical training with the Zen Center, she is a mentor for the Foundations in Buddhist Contemplative Care Training and has co-led contemplative bereavement groups and the Zen Center’s Living Fearlessly course. Doshin began her Buddhist practice over eleven years ago and this has increased with learning and commitment since becoming a formal Zen student with her teacher, Robert Chodo Campbell.

  • Evan Zazula, MA

    Evan works as a Chaplain with The Hertzberg Palliative Care Institute based at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. He began his training with NYZCCC in 2010 in the Foundations in Buddhist Contemplative Care Program, subsequently completing four units of Clinical Pastoral Education with NYZCCC at Mount Sinai, supporting its palliative care and oncology patients and families. Evan has been practicing Tibetan Buddhism/Dzogchen for fifteen years and is grateful for his ever-deepening Zen education with Dai-En, Koshin and Chodo. He has completed his Master of Arts in Pastoral Care and Counseling: Buddhist Track at New York Theological Seminary. For the past twenty-five years he has consulted for international businesses, organizations, and professionals. Evan has co-established the endowment for Jetsunma Tenzin Palmo’s Dongyu Gatsal Ling Nunnery in India and is also a cofounder and adviser of Dongyu Gatsal Ling Initiatives, a U.S. not-for-profit 501(c)(3). He lives in Manhattan with his husband, Rick.


Visiting Teachers

  • Allison Avery, MA

    Allison F. Avery has been in the diversity field and worked with marginalized populations for over two decades. She is currently the Director of Diversity and Inclusion at New York University School of Medicine. In this role, she is charged with overseeing and directing The Office of Diversity Affairs, the scope of which includes: developing and implementing institutional diversity and inclusion initiatives across the educational pipeline, designing and delivering cultural competency, health disparity and critical reflection curriculum, engaging in recruitment and retention efforts focused on demographic populations under-represented in medicine and managing health professions pipeline programming. Her subject matter expertise is unconscious bias, ethno-cultural empathy, organizational and analytical psychology. In addition to her role at NYU School of Medicine, Ms. Avery is a senior Psychoanalytic Candidate with the Jungian Psychoanalytic Association (JPA) and has a private practice in New York City. Previously, Ms. Avery served as a Peace Corps volunteer in Morocco addressing rural health disparities, women’s health issues and gender inequality. She received her Master of Arts in Counseling Psychology from New York University and her Bachelor of Arts in Philosophy from Baldwin-Wallace College. Ms. Avery has worked in organizational development in long-term care facilities and led a city-wide mental health and anti-stigma campaign focused on gero-psychology with the Mental Health Association of New York City. She facilitated a range of workshops, including: Fostering Understanding through Reminiscence and Life Narrative, and Triple Invisibility: The Intersection of Race, Gender, and Age. Ms. Avery has directed a myriad of community outreach and volunteer efforts, including advocacy for the dually diagnosed homeless population to youth programs on Lakota Sioux reservations.

  • Mark Doty

    Mark Doty‘s Fire to Fire: New and Selected Poems, won the National Book Award for Poetry in 2008. His eight books of poems include School of the Arts, Source, and My Alexandria. He has also published four volumes of nonfiction prose: Still Life with Oysters and Lemon, Heaven’s Coast, Firebird and Dog Years, which was a New York Times bestseller in 2007. Doty’s work has been honored by the National Book Critics Circle Award, the Los Angeles Times Book Prize, a Whiting Writers Award, two Lambda Literary Awards and the PEN/Martha Albrand Award for First Nonfiction. He is the only American poet to have received the T.S. Eliot Prize in the U.K., and has received fellowships from the Guggenheim, Ingram Merrill and Lila Wallace/Readers Digest Foundations, and from the National Endowment for the Arts. Doty lives in New York City and on the east end of Long Island.

  • Marie Howe

    Marie Howe was born in 1950 and received her MFA from Columbia University in 1983. Her debut volume, The Good Thief, was selected by Margaret Atwood as winner of the 1987 Open Competition of the National Poetry Series, published in 1988 by Persea Books. Since then, she has published two more collections, What the Living Do (W. W. Norton, 1998) and The Kingdom of the Ordinary (2008). In 1995, she edited (with Michael Klein) the anthology In the Company of My Solitude: American Writing from the AIDS Pandemic. About her work, the poet Stanley Kunitz has said, "Marie Howe's poetry is luminous, intense, and eloquent, rooted in an abundant inner life." Her awards include a fellowship at the Bunting Institute, as well as a Guggenheim Fellowship and a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship. She has served on the faculty of several schools, including Tufts University and Dartmouth College. She currently teaches at Sarah Lawrence, New York University, and Columbia University in New York City, where she lives with her daughter. In August 2012 she was named the State Poet Laureate of New York State.

  • Jay R. Horton, PhD, ACHPN, FNP-BC

    Jay R. Horton is the Director of the Palliative Care Consultation Service at the Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York City. As Assistant Professor at the Columbia University School of Nursing he co-developed the curriculum for the Palliative and End-of-Life Care Subspecialty Program, and continue there as Adjunct Professor. Horton received an MSN from the Yale School of Nursing, an MPH in health policy and administration from the Yale School of Public Health, completed fellowship training in Pain and Palliative Care at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, and a PhD in Nursing Research at the NYU College of Nursing. For his dissertation he conducted research on the effect of palliative care programs on hospital treatment intensity and have recently received pilot funding from the Mount Sinai Older Americans Independence Center (OAIC) / NIA to expand on his findings. In addition to Jay's research skills, he is an Advanced Certified Hospice and Palliative Care Nurse and teaches across the country on aspects of palliative care, pain management, and communication.

  • Josh Korda

    Josh Korda has been studying the dhamma since 1995 and received his initial teacher training with Noah Levine. He gives regular talks at DharmaPunx New York, as well as other sanghas in New York City. Over the years Josh has had the honor to sit with and learn from a variety of respected practitioners such as Ajahns Geoff, Brahm, Vajiro and Sucitto, to name a few. Josh lives in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, NY.

  • Diane E. Meier, MD

    Dr. Diane E. Meier is Director of the Center to Advance Palliative Care (CAPC), a national organization devoted to increasing the number and quality of palliative care programs in the United States. Under her leadership the number of palliative care programs in U.S. hospitals has more than tripled in the last 10 years. She is also Vice-chair for Public Policy and Professor of Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine; and Gaisman Professor of Medical Ethics at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City. In 2009-2010, she was a Health and Aging Policy Fellow in Washington, DC. Awards include a MacArthur Foundation ‘genius award’ Fellowship in 2008; HealthLeaders recognition as one of 20 Americans who make health care better in 2010; the American Cancer Society’s 2012 Medal of Honor for Cancer Control in recognition of her pioneering leadership of the effort to bring palliative care into mainstream medicine; and the American Geriatrics Society Edward Henderson State-of-the-Art Lecture Award in 2013.

  • Sharon Salzberg

    Sharon Salzberg is cofounder of the Insight Meditation Society (IMS) in Barre, Massachusetts. She is one of America’s leading spiritual teachers and authors, and has been a student of Buddhism since 1971, leading meditation retreats worldwide since 1974. Sharon’s latest book is The Force of Kindness, published by Sounds True. She is also the author of Faith: Trusting Your Own Deepest Experience, published by Riverhead Books; Lovingkindness: The Revolutionary Art of Happiness and A Heart as Wide as the World, both published by Shambhala Publications; and co-author with Joseph Goldstein of Insight Meditation, a Step-by-Step Course on How to Meditate (audio), from Sounds True. For more information about Sharon, please visit: www.SharonSalzberg.com.

  • Sebene Selassie

    Sebene Selassie is a meditation teacher and certified Integral Coach®. She has been studying Buddhism since majoring in Comparative Religious Studies as an undergrad at McGill University. For over 20 years she worked with children, youth, and families nationally and internationally for small and large not–for–profits. Her work has taken her everywhere from the Tenderloin in San Francisco to refugee camps in Guinea, West Africa. She currently serves on the Board of Directors of Barre Center for Buddhist Studies. Sebene is a breast cancer survivor.

  • Robert Schiller, MD, ABFP

    Robert (Red) Schiller is Senior Vice President, Clinical Affairs; Chair, Graduate Medical Education; Chair, Alfred and Gail Engelberg Department of Family Medicine at Mount Sinai/Beth Israel. He attended the New York University School of Medicine. He completed his residency in family medicine at Montefiore Medical Center in the Bronx, where he also completed a one-year fellowship in family medicine. He has a professional interest in homeopathy, acupuncture, and other alternative therapies that complement conventional medical care, as well as a strong interest in the integration of alternative medicine into primary care training. Dr. Schiller is the recipient of several awards including the Park-Davis Award for Teaching Medicine. Shiller is know for his leadership and innovation as a physician and administrator, serves on NYZCCC’s Advisory Board, and has worked closely with Koshin and Chodo on the upcoming Symposium as well as on other projects.