Who We Are

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Board of Directors

BOARD CHAIRMAN

  • Terrence Meck

    Terrence Meck is the Executive Director of The Palette Fund, a private foundation that honors the legacy of his late partner Rand Harlan Skolnick through collaborative grantmaking and programs that value human rights and education. Terrence started the foundation when Rand was diagnosed with Pancreatic Cancer in March of 2008 and passed away shortly there after. From 2003 to 2008 Terrence and Rand o-owned The Raven Resort Properties in New Hope, PA, providing a vibrant resource for the diverse LGBT community and hosting dozens of noteworthy charity events. Terrence received his B.A. in Political Science from Princeton University in 2000 and then worked in New York City in Public Relations and Marketing in both the publishing and fashion industries. In 2001, he helped launch Giving Opportunities To Others (GOTO) a nonprofit organization dedicated to immersing youth in art and music while encouraging philanthropic awareness and leadership among young professionals. He was a board member of Fighting AIDS Continuously Together (FACT Bucks County), served on the NY Leadership Council of the Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation (GLAAD) and currently sits on the Board of the Movement Advancement Project (MAP), a think tank that produces and disseminates research aimed at increasing the productivity of investments in the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) movement.


PRESIDENT

  • Joanne Heyman

    Joanne Heyman Founder and CEO of Heyman Partners, is internationally recognized as a thought leader, innovator and key advisor within the pro-social sector. A passionate entrepreneur of sustainable solutions for economic development and social impact, Ms. Heyman has led organizations and counseled leadership on all sides of the philanthropy table – non-profit, foundation and business. She founded Heyman Partners in 2010 in response to the critical need for leveraging opportunities, talent and assets across sectors to meet today’s social challenges. Prior to Heyman Partners, Ms. Heyman drove the growth and success of a wide variety of organizations worldwide. She was the founding Executive Director of Donna Karan’s Urban Zen Foundation, launching the flagship Urban Zen Center in New York City and directing the foundation’s international programming. She served as the Executive Director of The International Center in New York, Vice President of The Corporation of Yaddo, Managing Director of the Financial Services Volunteer Corps and as a senior advisor to The Goldman Sachs Foundation and the American Jewish World Service.Ms. Heyman holds a Masters of International Affairs from the Columbia University School of Public and International Affairs and a Bachelor of Arts in Comparative Literature from Smith College. She serves as President of the Board of the New York Zen Center of Contemplative Care, on the Board of Directors of CityKids, on the Advisory Board of LitWorld and on the Leadership Council of the Support Center for Non-profit Management.


TREASURER

  • Gerry McConnell

    Gerry McConnell has significant experience in the fields of finance, investment banking and private equity investment with a special focus on socially responsible investing. Gerry spent over 10 years as an investment banker providing strategic advice and raising capital for a range of clients operating in industries such as media and telecommunications, technology, manufacturing and retail. Beginning in 2000, Gerry was a senior partner at a private equity firm which pursued a socially responsible investment strategy of supporting and partnering with organized labor to invest in U.S. based manufacturing companies. More recently, Gerry has organized and raised capital for the creation of renewable and sustainable energy companies in the United States and Brazil. Gerry’s current focus is on harnessing the capital and creativity of the private sector to address social problems. Gerry has participated on the Boards of several large private and public companies and is currently on the Board of Brenco, Inc. (Brazilian Renewable Energy Corp.), Hawaii Bio-energy, llc and Cilion, Inc. He also serves on the board of the McConnell Family Foundation. Gerry has been a meditator and student of Buddhism for over six years. Gerry is currently a student of Roshi Enkyo O’Hara, at the Village Zendo.


SECRETARY

  • Reid Williams

    Reid Williams is a private investor, filmmaker, and philanthropist. His investments are focused around a family business and angel investing in green technology. As a filmmaker, he produced one documentary and one feature and directed one documentary. In 2002 he produced the film “Dangerous Living; Coming out in the Developing World” which documented the plights and successes of gays and lesbian peoples in the Global South. In 2006, he directed the documentary “Cruel and Unusual; Transgender Women in Prison” which revealed the horrors of life behind bars for transgender women in US prisons. In 2008, he was the executive producer for “Were the World Mine” a coming of age gay love story. The early focus of his philanthropy was on queer youth, and he served on the national board of GLSEN from 2001 to 2004. Since producing the film “Dangerous Living”, much of his philanthropy has been focused on gay and lesbian international work. He has been a strong supporter of the LGBT division at Human Rights Watch, and he is a member of the Executive Committee for this program.


  • Robert Chodo Campbell

    Rev. Robert Chodo Campbell, HCC co-founded the New York Zen Center for Contemplative Care, the first Buddhist organization to offer fully accredited chaplaincy training in America. The organization delivers contemplative approaches to care through education, direct service and meditation practice. In order to bring the work to a broader audience, he co-developed the Foundations in Buddhist Contemplative Care Training Program. Chodo is part of the core faculty for the Buddhist Track in the Master in Pastoral Care and Counseling at NYZCCC’s education partner, New York Theological Seminary. He is Co-Director of Contemplative Care Services for the Department of Integrative Medicine at Beth Israel Medical Center. Chodo is a dynamic, earthy, and visionary leader and teacher. His public programs have introduced thousands to the practices of mindful and compassionate care of the living and dying. 30,000 people listen to his podcasts each year.

    His groundbreaking work has been widely featured in the media, including the PBS Religion and Ethics Newsweekly, and in numerous print publications such as the New York Times and Los Angeles Times. He also authored the chapter “The Turning of the Dharma Wheel in Its Many Forms” in the book The Arts of Contemplative Care: Pioneering Voices in Buddhist Chaplaincy and Pastoral Work, Wisdom Publications, 2012. He is a Senior Zen Buddhist monk, Dharma Teacher, and senior chaplain.

  • Koshin Paley Ellison, MFA, LMSW, DMin

    Rev. Dr. Koshin Paley Ellison, MFA, LMSW, DMin, co-founded the New York Zen Center for Contemplative Care, the first Buddhist organization to offer fully accredited chaplaincy training in America and the organization delivers contemplative approaches to care through education, direct service and meditation practice. In order to bring the work to a broader audience, he co-developed the Foundations in Buddhist Contemplative Care Training Program. Koshin leads the Buddhist Track in the Master in Pastoral Care and Counseling at NYZCCCC’s education partner, New York Theological Seminary. He is the Co-Director of Contemplative Care Services for the Department of Integrative Medicine, and serves as the Chaplaincy Supervisor for the Pain and Palliative Care Department at Beth Israel Medical Center where he also serves on the Medical Ethics Committee.

    Koshin is a dynamic, original, and visionary leader and teacher. His public programs have introduced thousands to the practices of mindful and compassionate care of the living and dying. 30,000 people listen to his podcasts each year. His groundbreaking work has been widely featured in the media, including the PBS Religion and Ethics Newsweekly, and in numerous print publications such as the New York Times and Los Angeles Times. He is the co-author of the chapter “Rituals and Resilience,” in the book, Creating Spiritual and Psychological Resilience, Routledge, 2009. He also authored the chapter “The Jeweled Net: What Dogen and the Avatamsaka Sutra Can Offer Us as Spiritual Caregivers,” in the book The Arts of Contemplative Care: Pioneering Voices in Buddhist Chaplaincy and Pastoral Work, Wisdom Publications, 2012. He is a Senior Zen Buddhist Monk, Dharma Teacher, poet, chaplaincy supervisor and Jungian psychotherapist.

 

  • Martin H. Ehrlich, MD, MPH

    Dr. Martin H. Ehrlich, MD, MPH, Licensed Acupuncturist,Board Certified Internal Medicine Physician, is the Medical Director of The Beth Israel Continuum Center for Health and Healing. A graduate of Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons and School of Public Health and The American College of Acupuncture and Chengdu College of Traditional Chinese Medicine; he practices Integrative Medicine, combining the best of Eastern and Western traditions to provide patients with effective modalities to promote healing and well being. He studies, practices and teaches nutrition, yoga, meditation relaxation and breath awareness.

  • Rozanne Gold

    Rozanne Gold, renowned chef, journalist, and international food and restaurant consultant, has cooked for Presidents and Prime Ministers and began her career at age 23 as first chef to New York Mayor Ed Koch.  Considered one of the most prominent women in the food world, she is the author of thirteen cookbooks and a four-time winner of the prestigious James Beard Award.  Her most recent book, Radically Simple, was chosen as “one of the year’s best” by the New York Times and named one of the most important cookbooks of the past 25 years by Cooking Light Magazine.  Named a “Mover and Shaker” by Business Week, she helped re-create New York’s magical Rainbow Room atop Rockefeller Center (where she was co-owner and consulting chef for 15 years), the legendary Windows on the World, and three of New York’s three-star restaurants.  A graduate of Tufts University with honors in psychology and education, Rozanne recently “rescued” Gourmet Magazine’s 3500-cookbook library by purchasing it and donating it to New York University.  She has been on the Board of the Greyston Bakery, American Friends of Assaf Harofeh Medical Center, Les Dames d’Escoffier, and was a trustee of Arts Horizons.  She is a frequent guest on National Public Radio and writes for the Huffington Post and the Wall Street Journal among many other national publications.   An impassioned hospice volunteer and advocate in the field of contemplative care, she lives in Brooklyn with her husband and teenage daughter.

  • Fran Hauser

    Fran Hauser is President of Digital for Time Inc.’s Style and Entertainment and Lifestyle Groups. In her role, she oversees PEOPLE.com, the most visited site in the publishing industry, as well as EW.com, InStyle.com and others. These sites reach over 38 million unique visitors each month and generate more than one billion page views. Hauser is also responsible for the mobile and tablet strategy for these brands including the launch of over 20 consumer products, reaching more than 4 million users, available on the mobile web or as applications. Hauser has been in the digital media space for 14 years and played an integral role in the $400 million sale of Moviefone to AOL.  Earlier in her career, she held positions at PricewaterhouseCoopers, Ernst & Young and Coca-Cola Enterprises. In 2011, Hauser was named to the FOLIO: 40, a list of the most distinguished magazine and media professionals from every corner of the industry.  Two years earlier, she was named one of Ad Age’s “Women to Watch”, a list of the “30 marketers, media sellers and agency executives to keep your eye on today.”  She was also inducted into Media Industry Newsletter’s (MIN) Digital Hall of Fame in May 2008. Hauser is an active philanthropist serving on the Board of Directors of GlobalGiving and New York Zen Center for Contemplative Care. She is a co-founder of GlobalGiving’s New York Leadership Council and serves on the Leadership Council of the Young Women’s Leadership Network. Hauser is also an angel investor in technology and fashion startups and serves on their advisory boards.  She resides in Manhattan with her husband and two sons.

  • Patricia Karpas, MBA

    Patricia Karpas, MBA, is currently head of Digital Strategy and Marketing for Gaiam TV, a division of Gaiam Inc., a lifestyle media and e-commerce company, with a focus on health, wellness, yoga, personal growth and ‘conscious media’. In this role, she is responsible for strategic, digital and brand marketing for this streaming video subscription service. Previously, she was President of Karpas Ventures, a consulting company that specialized in digital media for emerging start-ups, media companies and non-profits with an emphasis on health, wellness and social responsibility. Her portfolio of consulting clients at Karpas Ventures included companies like Discovery Communications, Time Inc. Digital Entertainment and Style Group, Time Inc. Lifestyle and Health Group, NBC’s I Village, Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia Whole Living Brand and Zazengo, a social media start-up. For the first 18 years of her business career, she worked in areas related to Entertainment and Media. From 2001 to 2007, she was General Manager of AOL Television, where she created the AOL online television channel and was responsible for the development of Joint Ventures with Networks and Studios. Before joining AOL in 2001, she spent 11 years with NBC where she served as an executive in the broadcast, cable and digital divisions, including CNBC, NBC, and NBC Interactive. While at NBC.com, she lead the development of innovative, interactive business strategies for NBC programs like Saturday Night Live, The Tonight Show, ER, and The Olympics. Prior to joining NBC, Karpas spent six years with Time Warner Cable where she was responsible for retention marketing. In addition to New York Zen Center, Patricia also serves on the Board of Trustees of Continuum Health Partners/Beth Israel, and she serves on the Board of Advisors for the Artists for Charity’s Ethiopian Orphanage. Patricia currently splits her time between NYC and Boulder, Colorado.

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Leadership Team

Founders & Co-Executive Directors

  • Robert Chodo Campbell

    Rev. Robert Chodo Campbell, HCC co-founded the New York Zen Center for Contemplative Care, the first Buddhist organization to offer fully accredited chaplaincy training in America. The organization delivers contemplative approaches to care through education, direct service and meditation practice. In order to bring the work to a broader audience, he co-developed the Foundations in Buddhist Contemplative Care Training Program. Chodo is part of the core faculty for the Buddhist Track in the Master in Pastoral Care and Counseling at NYZCCC’s education partner, New York Theological Seminary. He is Co-Director of Contemplative Care Services for the Department of Integrative Medicine at Beth Israel Medical Center. Chodo is a dynamic, earthy, and visionary leader and teacher. His public programs have introduced thousands to the practices of mindful and compassionate care of the living and dying. 30,000 people listen to his podcasts each year.

    His groundbreaking work has been widely featured in the media, including the PBS Religion and Ethics Newsweekly, and in numerous print publications such as the New York Times and Los Angeles Times. He also authored the chapter “The Turning of the Dharma Wheel in Its Many Forms” in the book The Arts of Contemplative Care: Pioneering Voices in Buddhist Chaplaincy and Pastoral Work, Wisdom Publications, 2012. He is a Senior Zen Buddhist monk, Dharma Teacher, and senior chaplain.

  • Koshin Paley Ellison, MFA, LMSW, DMin

    Rev. Dr. Koshin Paley Ellison, MFA, LMSW, DMin, co-founded the New York Zen Center for Contemplative Care, the first Buddhist organization to offer fully accredited chaplaincy training in America and the organization delivers contemplative approaches to care through education, direct service and meditation practice. In order to bring the work to a broader audience, he co-developed the Foundations in Buddhist Contemplative Care Training Program. Koshin leads the Buddhist Track in the Master in Pastoral Care and Counseling at NYZCCCC’s education partner, New York Theological Seminary. He is the Co-Director of Contemplative Care Services for the Department of Integrative Medicine, and serves as the Chaplaincy Supervisor for the Pain and Palliative Care Department at Beth Israel Medical Center where he also serves on the Medical Ethics Committee.

    Koshin is a dynamic, original, and visionary leader and teacher. His public programs have introduced thousands to the practices of mindful and compassionate care of the living and dying. 30,000 people listen to his podcasts each year. His groundbreaking work has been widely featured in the media, including the PBS Religion and Ethics Newsweekly, and in numerous print publications such as the New York Times and Los Angeles Times. He is the co-author of the chapter “Rituals and Resilience,” in the book, Creating Spiritual and Psychological Resilience, Routledge, 2009. He also authored the chapter “The Jeweled Net: What Dogen and the Avatamsaka Sutra Can Offer Us as Spiritual Caregivers,” in the book The Arts of Contemplative Care: Pioneering Voices in Buddhist Chaplaincy and Pastoral Work, Wisdom Publications, 2012. He is a Senior Zen Buddhist Monk, Dharma Teacher, poet, chaplaincy supervisor and Jungian psychotherapist.


ACPE CPE Chaplaincy Supervisor

  • Trudi Jinpu Hirsch, ZPO, ACPE

    Rev. Trudi Jinpu Hirsch, ZPO, ACPE, Chaplain Supervisor and is a Senior Soto Zen Buddhist Priest. Jinpu is an Adjunct Professor in the Buddhist Track at New York Theological Seminary.  She was a monastic at Zen Mountain Monastery for eleven years. She was the acting Director and Chaplain Supervisor for Beth Israel Medical Center for four years. Jinpu is on the Core Faculty of the Center’s Buddhist Chaplaincy Training Program, and she is the Supervisor for the Zen Center’s Buddhist CPE Training Program. She also authored the chapter “The Four Noble Truths as a Framework for Contemplative Care,” in the book The Arts of Contemplative Care: Pioneering Voices in Buddhist Chaplaincy and Pastoral Work, Wisdom Publications, 2012.


Manager of Programs and Marketing

  • Mary Remington, HHP

    Mary Remington, HHP, has been with the organization since its inception in 2007, starting as a student in the Foundations in Buddhist Contemplative Care Training Program.  She began managerial support of the center soon thereafter, and then continued her contemplative training via NYZCCC’s Clinical Pastoral Education program.  She has worked directly with patients as a volunteer at VNSNY and as a chaplain in training with Beth Israel Medical Center and has also co-lead a grief support group with Robert Chodo Campbell.  Mary and her husband recently had a baby daughter, and she is now learning new contemplative ropes through being a mother, while continuing her dedicated, professional relationship with NYZCCC.


Administrative Manager

  • Richard Stegman

    Richard Stegman graduated from Hofstra University with a BFA in Theatre Arts and has performed Off-Broadway and on numerous regional stages for over two decades. He has managed a decade of national tours for PBS’s Slim Goodbody, and has served as the Manager of Operations for the 6666 Ranch Guest Lodge in White Sulphur Springs, Montana, Special Events Co-ordinator for Sotheby’s NYC and as the Performing Arts Director for Camp Kippewa in Monmouth, Maine. Richard recently held the seat of Registrar at the Shambhala Meditation Center of New York, where he is an assistant teacher. Richard is also a professional photographer. A trip to Nepal to celebrate his birthday changed his life forever. He has been a Buddhist practitioner for over a decade.


Staff Chaplain and Educational Coordinator

  • James Morgan, MA

    James Morgan, MA, is a Staff Chaplain and Education Coordinator at the New York Zen Center for Contemplative Care. James began his journey with the New York Zen Center as a Foundations student, volunteering as a Contemplative Caregiver at the Visiting Nurse Service of New York Hospice Residence. Since that time, he has completed his studies of five units of Clinical Pastoral Education (CPE) as a Chaplain Intern in NYZCCC’s Buddhist chaplaincy program. He has worked as a chaplain in a variety of environments, including a geriatric psychiatric floor as well as neurological and pediatric intensive care units at both Beth Israel Medical Center and Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center. The sudden death of his father in December 2000, led James to Buddhist teachings and practice. In addition to his care giving work, James writes and edits English as a Second Language textbooks that are sold internationally.

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Advisory Council

  • Craig D. Blinderman, MD

    Dr. Craig D. Blinderman, M.D., is currently the director of the Adult Palliative Medicine Service at Columbia University Medical Center and serves on the advisory board for the New York Zen Center for Contemplative Care. He was previously an attending physician on the Palliative Care Service at the Massachusetts General Hospital and directed the MGH Cancer Pain Clinic. Dr. Binderman received his M.A. in philosophy from Columbia before earning his medical degree from Ben Gurion University in Israel. He completed both a residency in Family Medicine and a fellowship in Hospice and Palliative Medicine at Beth Israel Medical Center in NY. He then went on to complete a medical ethics fellowship at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Blinderman has published articles and chapters on early palliative care in lung cancer patients, medical ethics, existential distress, symptom assessment and quality of life in chronic lung and heart failure patients, as well as pain management in hematology and oncology patients and patients with a history of substance abuse. He is currently the section editor for Case Discussions in the Journal of Palliative Medicine. His academic interests include: decision-making at the end of life, the role of palliative care in public health, medical ethics, and the integration of palliative care in critical care medicine. He also has a strong interest in teaching and developing programs to improve students and residents’ skills in communication and care for the dying.

  • Rande Gail Brown

    Rande Gail Brown, LMSW, was a founding board member and formerly the Executive Director of the Tricycle Foundation, publisher of Tricycle: The Buddhist Review, America’s leading Buddhist magazine. With a degree in East Asian Studies from Princeton University, Rande lived for many years in Japan, where she was Associate Director of the International Division of the Institute for Religion and Psychology in Tokyo. Upon returning to the U.S., she founded East West Communications, a leading force in cross-cultural programming between Japan and the United States for over 20 years. A well-known translator of Japanese spiritual and cultural texts, Rande co-authored the New York Times bestseller Geisha, A Life with Mineko Iwasaki (Atria, 2002). Rande is a proud graduate of the first Foundations Course of the NYZCCC (2008). Her experience as a volunteer chaplain inspired her to become a licensed psychotherapist with a specific interest in the intersection of Buddhism, spirituality, and psychology.  She is currently a candidate in the Psychoanalytic Training Program of the William Alanson White Institute of Psychiatry, Psychoanalysis & Psychology.

  • Gil Fronsdal

    Gil is the primary teacher for the Insight Meditation Center in Redwood City, California; he has been teaching since 1990. He has practiced Zen and Vipassana in the U.S. and Asia since 1975. He was a Theravada monk in Burma in 1985, and in 1989 began training with Jack Kornfield to be a Vipassana teacher. He was ordained as a Soto Zen priest at the San Francisco Zen Center in 1982, and in 1995 received Dharma Transmission from Mel Weitsman, the abbot of the Berkeley Zen Center. Gil has an undergraduate degree in agriculture from U.C. Davis where he was active in promoting the field of sustainable farming. In 1998 he received a PhD in Religious Studies from Stanford University. Gil teaches at Spirit Rock Meditation Center where he is part of its Teachers Collective. He is a founder of the Buddhist Chaplaincy Training Program at the Sati Center for Buddhist Studies. He is a husband and a father of two boys.

  • (Roshi) Bernie Glassman

    Zen Master (Roshi) Bernie Glassman is a world-renowned pioneer in the American Zen Movement. He is a spiritual leader, published author, accomplished academic and successful businessman with a PhD in Applied Mathematics. Dr. Glassman currently teaches and travels, giving talks and workshops on spiritual practice, socially responsible business and international peacemaking. He is the founder and co-spiritual director of the Zen Peacemakers. Bernie is the co-author, with Rick Fields, of Instructions to the Cook: A Zen Master’s Lessons in Living a Life that Matters (Bell Tower, April 1996), the author of Bearing Witrness: A Zen Master’s Lessons in Making Peace (Bell Tower, May 1997), and Infinite Circle: Studies in Zen (Shambhala Publication, spring 2002).

  • Ryushin Paul Haller

    From Belfast, Northern Ireland, Ryushin Paul Haller left home in 1971, lived in London for a year, then traveled throughout Europe, the middle east, Russia, and Afghanistan. He ended up in Japan, where he lived for a year and was introduced to Zen. Then he traveled throughout southeast Asia. He was ordained a Buddhist monk in Thailand, where he spent six months sitting in a remote cave. Moving to Tassajara Zen Mountain Center in 1974, Paul was ordained as a priest by Zentatsu Richard Baker in 1980, who gave him the name Ryushin Zendo, “Dragon Heart, Zen Way.” In 1993 he received Dharma Transmission from Sojun Mel Weitsman. Founder and formerly Director of Outreach at SFZC, Paul is interested in finding ways of expressing our practice in society, both as compassionate service and making it available to as many people as possible. He became abbot of Zen Center in 2003. He is a founder of the Buddhist Chaplaincy Training Program at the Sati Center for Buddhist Studies, in Redwood City, California.

  • Craig Harwood

    Craig Harwood was a successful parking and real estate developer for 20 years when he began producing and writing award winning documentaries, plays and screenplays. These include, “The Most Famous Woman in the World,” based on the life of the first famous transsexual Christine Jorgensen, “Hunting Paradise” based on the life of Huntington Hartford, the heir to the A & P fortune and PATERNAL INSTINCT, the story of two gay men who have a child with a surrogate mother, which premiered on HBO/Cinemax. Craig signed Wendy Kram as his manager in 2012. In addition, Harwood is an activist who sits on the board of The Lantern Group, the largest organization in NY providing low income housing and The Threshold Foundation, a community of individuals who mobilize money, people and power to create a more just, joyful and sustainable world.

  • Diane E. Meier, MD

    Dr. Diane E. Meier, MD, is Director of the Center to Advance Palliative Care (CAPC), a national organization devoted to increasing the number and quality of palliative care programs in the United States. She is also Director of the Lilian and Benjamin Hertzberg Palliative Care Institute; Professor of Geriatrics and Internal Medicine; and Catherine Gaisman Professor of Medical Ethics at Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York City where she has served on the faculty since 1983. Meier is the recipient of numerous awards, including the 2008 MacArthur Fellowship, National Institute on Aging Academic Career Leadership Award, the Open Society Institute Faculty Scholar’s Award of the Project on Death in America, the Founders Award of the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization, and the Alexander Richman Commemorative Award for Humanism in Medicine. She is the recipient of a five-year NIA Academic Career Leadership Award, and she is the Principal Investigator of an NCI-funded five-year multi-site study on the outcomes of hospital palliative care services in cancer patients.

  • Woodson C. Merrell, MD, ScD (hc)

    Dr. Woodson C. Merrell, MD, ScD (hc) is the M. Anthony Fisher Director of Integrative Medicine at the Continuum Center for Health and Healing and the Chairman of the Department of Integrative Medicine at Beth Israel. He has expertise and special interests in mind-body therapies (especially yoga, qi gong, and meditation), acupuncture, botanical therapies, nutrition and nutraceuticals, homeopathy, and indigenous healing systems (particularly Tibetan and Chinese Medicine). He has served as director, scientific director, co-developer, presenter and on the advisory boards for many professional medical conferences such as: Nutritional Medicine; Botanical Medicine; Native American Healing Traditions; Tibetan Medicine; CAM Expo; and Models of Healthcare. He has served as Chairman of New York State’s Board of Acupuncture, and since 1995 has been a Board Member of New York State’s Office of Professional Medical Conduct. Dr. Merrell is on the Steering and Policy Committees of the national Consortium of Academic Health Centers for Integrative Medicine, comprising 25% of the nation’s medical schools, pledged to transform medical education and physician training with integrative medicine. In 2004 he was a finalist for the first annual Bravewell Award for leadership in integrative medicine. He is a frequent guest and commentator for all major media both regionally and nationally, including CBS Morning Show, CNN, NPR, WBAI, Time, Forbes, NY Times, Wall Street Journal, and more.

  • T. Kenjitsu Nakagaki

    Rev. T. Kenjitsu Nakagaki is the head resident minister of New York Buddhist Church — Jodoshinshu (Shin Buddhist) Temple; chairperson of the Eastern District Buddhist Ministers Associations of BCA; former president of the Buddhist Council of New York; former UCM Buddhist Chaplain at Columbia University; Board of Trustee of the Institute of Buddhist Studies; adviser of American Buddhist Study Center; Active in Interfaith Circles such as the Interfaith Center of New York(vice chair), The Interfaith Alliance (board). Religions for Peace (board); Also active in Asian and Japanese communities such as Japanese American Association of New York (board member), Japanese American Lions Club (honorable advisor), Asian & Pacific Islander Coalition on HIV/AIDS (religious advisor). He is an author of “New York Bozu Indo o Aruku (Gendai-shokan Publisher in Japan, 2003).” He has been active in peace-building activities. He has organized Interfaith Peace ceremony to commemorate Hiroshima/ Nagasaki atomic bombing every year on August 5, since 1994. He has organized Annual Floating Lanterns Ceremony to commemorate WTC 9-11 tragedy at Hudson River on September 11, since 2002.

  • Frank Ostaseski

    In 1987, Frank Ostaseski co-founded the Zen Hospice Project, the first Buddhist hospice in American 2004, he created Metta Institute to bring his work to a broader audience and develop the End-of-Life Care Practitioner Program that Frank leads with faculty members Ram Dass, Zoketsu Norman Fischer, Rachel Naomi Remen MD, and many others.Frank is a dynamic, original, and visionary teacher. His public programs have introduced thousands to the practices of mindful and compassionate care of the dying. His groundbreaking work has been widely featured in the media, including the Bill Moyers television series On Our Own Terms, The Oprah Winfrey Show, and in numerous print publications. In 2001, Frank was honored by the Dalai Lama for his years of compassionate service to the dying and their families.

  • Richard K. Payne, Dean of the Institute of Buddhist Studies

    Richard K. Payne, Dean of the Institute of Buddhist Studies, grew up in the San José area where there is a large and vibrant Japanese American community centered on the San Jose Buddhist Betsuin. At San JosJosé State University his interests came to focus on modern Continental philosophy and psychology, completing his studies for both a BA (Philosophy-Psychology, 1972) and an MA (Philosophy,1975) there. He also pursued studies at the Nyingma Institute, Berkeley, receiving an MA (Buddhist Studies, 1981), with a thesis on the concept of apoha in the Buddhist epistemologists (published, Journal of Indian Philosophy, 1987). In order to continue work on Buddhism, he entered the doctoral program in History and Phenomenology of Religion at the Graduate Theological Union. His dissertation research was on the votive fire offering in the Shingon tradition, and included training for the Shingon priesthood on Mt. Koya in Japan. He graduated in 1985, at which point he began teaching for the Institute of Buddhist Studies. In 1994 he was appointed to his current position. He continues to be active in the fields of Japanese Buddhist studies, ritual studies, and the cognitive study of religion. He also serves as editor-in-chief of the Institute’s annual journal, Pacific World, and is chair of the Editorial Committee of the Pure Land Buddhist Studies Series.

  • Russell Portenoy, MD

    Dr. Russell Portenoy is chairman of the Department of Pain Medicine and Palliative Care and the Gerald J. Friedman Chair in Pain Medicine and Palliative Care at Beth Israel Medical Center, New York.  He is the Chief Medical Officer of MJHS Hospice and Palliative Care and Professor of Neurology and Anesthesiology at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine. Dr. Portenoy is past-president of the American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine and past-president of the American Pain Society.  He previously chaired the American Board of Hospice and Palliative Medicine and currently serves on the Board of Directors of the American Pain Foundation.  He is a recipient of the Lifetime Achievement Award and the National Leadership Award of the American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine, has received both the Wilbert Fordyce Award for Lifetime Excellence in Clinical Investigation and the Distinguished Service Award from the American Pain Society, and was given the Founder’s Award by the American Academy of Pain Medicine.  Dr. Portenoy has been Editor‑in‑Chief of the Journal of Pain and Symptom Management for more than two decades and is editor for the palliative care section of The Oncologist.  He serves on numerous other editorial boards.  He has written, co-authored, or edited 20 books and more than 500 papers and book chapters on topics in pain and symptom management, opioid pharmacotherapy, and palliative care.

  • Sharon Salzberg

    Sharon Salzberg is cofounder of the Insight Meditation Society (IMS) in Barre, Massachusetts. She is one of America’s leading spiritual teachers and authors, and has been a student of Buddhism since 1971, leading meditation retreats worldwide since 1974. Sharon’s latest book is The Force of Kindness, published by Sounds True. She is also the author of Faith: Trusting Your Own Deepest Experience, published by Riverhead Books; Lovingkindness: The Revolutionary Art of Happiness and A Heart as Wide as the World, both published by Shambhala Publications; and co-author with Joseph Goldstein of Insight Meditation, a Step-by-Step Course on How to Meditate (audio), from Sounds True. For more information about Sharon, please visit: www.SharonSalzberg.com.

  • Gina Sharpe

    Gina Sharpe is a co-founder and Guiding Teacher of New York Insight Meditation Center. She is a graduate of the first Spirit Rock Community Dharma Leaders Program. Her primary mentor is Jack Kornfield. She has been teaching meditation and Dharma for 11 years. She has taught at Spirit Rock Meditation Center, Insight Meditation Society (IMS), Asia Society, Tibet House, the New York Open Center, the Katonah Yoga Center, and at other centers in the U. S. and helped to initiate and teach People of Color retreats at IMS. For the past four years, she has been a volunteer teacher of Dharma and meditation at the only maximum security prison for women in New York State.

  • Polly Young-Eisendrath, Ph.D.

    Polly Young-Eisendrath, Ph.D., Jungian analyst and psychologist; Clinical Supervisor and Consultant in Leadership Development, Norwich University, Northfield, Vermont; Clinical Associate Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont; Private Practice, Central Vermont; has published fourteen books, translated into twenty languages, including: The Self-Esteem Trap: Raising Confident and Compassionate Kids in an Age of Self-Importance; The Cambridge Companion to Jung: New and Revised (both in press); Awakening and Insight: Zen Buddhism and Psychotherapy; The Resilient Spirit: Transforming Suffering into Insight and Renewal.

Teachers & Facilitators

RESIDENT TEACHERS

  • Robert Chodo Campbell

    Rev. Robert Chodo Campbell, HCC co-founded the New York Zen Center for Contemplative Care, the first Buddhist organization to offer fully accredited chaplaincy training in America. The organization delivers contemplative approaches to care through education, direct service and meditation practice. In order to bring the work to a broader audience, he co-developed the Foundations in Buddhist Contemplative Care Training Program. Chodo is part of the core faculty for the Buddhist Track in the Master in Pastoral Care and Counseling at NYZCCC’s education partner, New York Theological Seminary. He is Co-Director of Contemplative Care Services for the Department of Integrative Medicine at Beth Israel Medical Center. Chodo is a dynamic, earthy, and visionary leader and teacher. His public programs have introduced thousands to the practices of mindful and compassionate care of the living and dying. 30,000 people listen to his podcasts each year.

    His groundbreaking work has been widely featured in the media, including the PBS Religion and Ethics Newsweekly, and in numerous print publications such as the New York Times and Los Angeles Times. He also authored the chapter “The Turning of the Dharma Wheel in Its Many Forms” in the book The Arts of Contemplative Care: Pioneering Voices in Buddhist Chaplaincy and Pastoral Work, Wisdom Publications, 2012. He is a Senior Zen Buddhist monk, Dharma Teacher, and senior chaplain.

  • Koshin Paley Ellison, MFA, LMSW, DMin

    Rev. Dr. Koshin Paley Ellison, MFA, LMSW, DMin, co-founded the New York Zen Center for Contemplative Care, the first Buddhist organization to offer fully accredited chaplaincy training in America and the organization delivers contemplative approaches to care through education, direct service and meditation practice. In order to bring the work to a broader audience, he co-developed the Foundations in Buddhist Contemplative Care Training Program. Koshin leads the Buddhist Track in the Master in Pastoral Care and Counseling at NYZCCCC’s education partner, New York Theological Seminary. He is the Co-Director of Contemplative Care Services for the Department of Integrative Medicine, and serves as the Chaplaincy Supervisor for the Pain and Palliative Care Department at Beth Israel Medical Center where he also serves on the Medical Ethics Committee.

    Koshin is a dynamic, original, and visionary leader and teacher. His public programs have introduced thousands to the practices of mindful and compassionate care of the living and dying. 30,000 people listen to his podcasts each year. His groundbreaking work has been widely featured in the media, including the PBS Religion and Ethics Newsweekly, and in numerous print publications such as the New York Times and Los Angeles Times. He is the co-author of the chapter “Rituals and Resilience,” in the book, Creating Spiritual and Psychological Resilience, Routledge, 2009. He also authored the chapter “The Jeweled Net: What Dogen and the Avatamsaka Sutra Can Offer Us as Spiritual Caregivers,” in the book The Arts of Contemplative Care: Pioneering Voices in Buddhist Chaplaincy and Pastoral Work, Wisdom Publications, 2012. He is a Senior Zen Buddhist Monk, Dharma Teacher, poet, chaplaincy supervisor and Jungian psychotherapist.

VISITING TEACHERS AND FACILITATORS

  • Allison Avery, MA

    Allison Avery, MA, is the Director of The Office of Diversity Affairs at NYU School of Medicine. In this position, she develops and oversees programming and initiatives aimed at promoting cultural competency, reducing health disparities, and the recruitment and retention of under-represented minorities in medicine. Previously, Ms. Avery worked in organizational development of long-term care facilities. She has designed and facilitated a range of workshops, including: An Introduction to Race and the Unconscious, Fostering Understanding through Reminiscence and Life Narrative, and Triple Invisibility: The Intersection of Race, Gender, and Age. Allison is a returned Peace Corps volunteer; her work in Morocco addressed rural health disparities, women’s health issues and gender inequalities. In addition to her role at NYU, Allison is a Psychoanalytic Candidate at the Jungian Psychoanalytic Association.

  • Craig D. Blinderman, MD

    Dr. Craig D. Blinderman, M.D., is currently the director of the Adult Palliative Medicine Service at Columbia University Medical Center and serves on the advisory board for the New York Zen Center for Contemplative Care. He was previously an attending physician on the Palliative Care Service at the Massachusetts General Hospital and directed the MGH Cancer Pain Clinic. Dr. Binderman received his M.A. in philosophy from Columbia before earning his medical degree from Ben Gurion University in Israel. He completed both a residency in Family Medicine and a fellowship in Hospice and Palliative Medicine at Beth Israel Medical Center in NY. He then went on to complete a medical ethics fellowship at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Blinderman has published articles and chapters on early palliative care in lung cancer patients, medical ethics, existential distress, symptom assessment and quality of life in chronic lung and heart failure patients, as well as pain management in hematology and oncology patients and patients with a history of substance abuse. He is currently the section editor for Case Discussions in the Journal of Palliative Medicine. His academic interests include: decision-making at the end of life, the role of palliative care in public health, medical ethics, and the integration of palliative care in critical care medicine. He also has a strong interest in teaching and developing programs to improve students and residents’ skills in communication and care for the dying.

  • Mark Doty

    Mark Doty‘s Fire to Fire: New and Selected Poems, won the National Book Award for Poetry in 2008. His eight books of poems include School of the Arts, Source, and My Alexandria. He has also published four volumes of nonfiction prose: Still Life with Oysters and Lemon, Heaven’s Coast, Firebird and Dog Years, which was a New York Times bestseller in 2007. Doty’s work has been honored by the National Book Critics Circle Award, the Los Angeles Times Book Prize, a Whiting Writers Award, two Lambda Literary Awards and the PEN/Martha Albrand Award for First Nonfiction. He is the only American poet to have received the T.S. Eliot Prize in the U.K., and has received fellowships from the Guggenheim, Ingram Merrill and Lila Wallace/Readers Digest Foundations, and from the National Endowment for the Arts. Doty lives in New York City and on the east end of Long Island.

  • Peter N. Gregory, PhD

    Peter N. Gregory joined the Smith College faculty in 1999. After receiving his doctorate in East Asian languages and civilizations from Harvard University in 1981, he taught in the Program for the Study of Religion at the University of Illinois for fifteen years. He has also served as the president and executive director of the Kuroda Institute for the Study of Buddhism and Human Values since 1984, and in that capacity he has directed two publication series with the University of Hawaii Press: “Studies in East Asian Buddhism” and “Classics in East Asian Buddhism.” Gregory’s research has focused on medieval Chinese Buddhism, especially the Chan and Huayan traditions during the Tang and Song dynasties, on which he has written or edited seven books, including Tsung-mi and the Sinification of Buddhism (1991). He is currently completing a translation of a ninth-century Chinese Buddhist text on the historical and doctrinal origins of the Chan tradition. Since coming to Smith, Gregory’s research and teaching have become increasingly concerned with Buddhism in America, on which he produced a film, The Gate of Sweet Nectar: Feeding Hungry Spirits in an American Zen Community (2004), and co-edited a book, Women Practicing Buddhism: American Experiences (Wisdom Publications, 2007).

  • Marie Howe

    Marie Howe was born in 1950 and received her MFA from Columbia University in 1983. Her debut volume, The Good Thief, was selected by Margaret Atwood as winner of the 1987 Open Competition of the National Poetry Series, published in 1988 by Persea Books. Since then, she has published two more collections, What the Living Do (W. W. Norton, 1998) and The Kingdom of the Ordinary (2008). In 1995, she edited (with Michael Klein) the anthology In the Company of My Solitude: American Writing from the AIDS Pandemic. About her work, the poet Stanley Kunitz has said, “Marie Howe’s poetry is luminous, intense, and eloquent, rooted in an abundant inner life.” Her awards include a fellowship at the Bunting Institute, as well as a Guggenheim Fellowship and a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship. She has served on the faculty of several schools, including Tufts University and Dartmouth College. She currently teaches at Sarah Lawrence, New York University, and Columbia University in New York City, where she lives with her daughter. In August 2012 she was named the State Poet Laureate of New York State.

  • Jay R. Horton, PhD, ACHPN, FNP-BC

    Jay R. Horton is the Director of the Palliative Care Consultation Service at the Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York City. As Assistant Professor at the Columbia University School of Nursing he co-developed the curriculum for the Palliative and End-of-Life Care Subspecialty Program, and continue there as Adjunct Professor. Horton received an MSN from the Yale School of Nursing, an MPH in health policy and administration from the Yale School of Public Health, completed fellowship training in Pain and Palliative Care at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, and a PhD in Nursing Research at the NYU College of Nursing. For his dissertation he conducted research on the effect of palliative care programs on hospital treatment intensity and have recently received pilot funding from the Mount Sinai Older Americans Independence Center (OAIC) / NIA to expand on his findings. In addition to Jay’s research skills, he is an Advanced Certified Hospice and Palliative Care Nurse and teaches across the country on aspects of palliative care, pain management, and communication.

  • Trudi Jinpu Hirsch, ZPO, ACPE

    Rev. Trudi Jinpu Hirsch, ZPO, ACPE, Chaplain Supervisor and is a Senior Soto Zen Buddhist Priest. Jinpu is an Adjunct Professor in the Buddhist Track at New York Theological Seminary.  She was a monastic at Zen Mountain Monastery for eleven years. She was the acting Director and Chaplain Supervisor for Beth Israel Medical Center for four years. Jinpu is on the Core Faculty of the Center’s Buddhist Chaplaincy Training Program, and she is the Supervisor for the Zen Center’s Buddhist CPE Training Program. She also authored the chapter “The Four Noble Truths as a Framework for Contemplative Care,” in the book The Arts of Contemplative Care: Pioneering Voices in Buddhist Chaplaincy and Pastoral Work, Wisdom Publications, 2012.

  • Pilar Jennings, PhD

    Pilar Jennings is a writer and researcher who has focused on the clinical applications of Buddhist meditation practices. She received her Ph.D. in Psychiatry and Religion from Union Theological Seminary, and has been working with patients and their families through the Harlem Family Institute since 2004. Dr. Jennings is a long-term practitioner of Tibetan and Vipassana Buddhism.

    Her publications have included “East Of Ego: The Intersection of Narcissism and Buddhist Meditation Practice,” and “I’ve Been Waiting for you: Reflections on Analytic Pain.” Her most recent book, Mixing Minds, was released in December, 2010 through Wisdom Publications, explores the interpersonal dynamics between Buddhist teachers and their Western students, in comparison to the relationships between psychoanalysts and their patients. Dr. Jennings is a researcher at the Columbia University Center for Study of Science and Religion, where she explores the impact of narcissism on environmental issues.  She is also a facilitator of a Columbia University Faculty Seminar addressing topics related to slavery and memory. In her ongoing psychotherapeutic work with inner city families, Dr. Jennings has sought to explore the impact of racism on children. With her unique approach to clinical work, she has integrated traditional psychological healing models and meditation. Pilar has also trained as a Buddhist Contemplative Care Provider through the New York Zen Center for Contemplative Care.  Through this training and contemplative care at Beth Israel Hospital in New York City, Pilar has brought the combination of her divergent interests and background to another population in need of sensitive psychological and spiritual care.  As a contemplative care provider, she has made efforts to explore the psychological and spiritual needs of disenfranchised populations.

  • Josh Korda

    Josh Korda has been studying the dhamma since 1995 and received his initial teacher training with Noah Levine. He gives regular talks at DharmaPunx New York, as well as other sanghas in New York City. Over the years Josh has had the honor to sit with and learn from a variety of respected practitioners such as Ajahns Geoff, Brahm, Vajiro and Sucitto, to name a few. Josh lives in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, NY.

  • Diane E. Meier, MD

    Dr. Diane E. Meier, MD, is Director of the Center to Advance Palliative Care (CAPC), a national organization devoted to increasing the number and quality of palliative care programs in the United States. She is also Director of the Lilian and Benjamin Hertzberg Palliative Care Institute; Professor of Geriatrics and Internal Medicine; and Catherine Gaisman Professor of Medical Ethics at Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York City where she has served on the faculty since 1983. Meier is the recipient of numerous awards, including the 2008 MacArthur Fellowship, National Institute on Aging Academic Career Leadership Award, the Open Society Institute Faculty Scholar’s Award of the Project on Death in America, the Founders Award of the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization, and the Alexander Richman Commemorative Award for Humanism in Medicine. She is the recipient of a five-year NIA Academic Career Leadership Award, and she is the Principal Investigator of an NCI-funded five-year multi-site study on the outcomes of hospital palliative care services in cancer patients.

  • Bruce (B.J.) Miller, MD

    Dr. Bruce (B.J.) Miller, M.D. executive director of the Zen Hospice Project. He is also a hospice and palliative care specialist who treats hospitalized patients with terminal or life-altering illness at UCSF Medical Center. He also sees patients in a palliative care clinic, the Symptom Management Service, of the UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center.

    Miller, a native of Chicago, studied art history as an undergraduate at Princeton University. He worked for several years for art and disability-rights nonprofit organizations before earning a medical degree at UCSF. He completed an internal medicine residency at Cottage Hospital in Santa Barbara, where he was chief resident, and a fellowship in Hospice and Palliative Medicine at Harvard Medical School, working at the Massachusetts General Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. In his work, he connects art, spirituality and medicine in end-of-life care. Miller is an assistant clinical professor of medicine in the Division of General Internal Medicine. He has a grant from the Fetzer Foundation to help integrate spirituality with the health of mind and body into medical education.

  • Rev. Leslye Noyes, MDiv, LP, LMHC

    Rev. Leslye Noyes, MDiv, LP, LMHC, is a certified Jungian Analyst in private practice in NYC. Leslye sees individuals and couples and supervises therapists interested in learning how to work symbolically. She graduated from Union Theological Seminary and is an ordained UCC minister. She was awarded the Post. M.Div. Mission Fellowship from the United Church Board for Homeland Ministries, which she used to develop visual art as a ministerial tool. Leslye completed training programs at Gestalt Associates for Psychotherapy, Blanton Peale Institutes for Religion and Mental Health and the Jungian Psychoanalytic Association. She is a certified Pastoral Counselor and a Fellow of the American Association of Pastoral Counselors. She currently serves as the Coordinator of Clinical Practices at the Jungian Psychoanalytic Association.

  • Andrew Olendzki, PhD

    Andrew Olendzki, PhD, was trained in Buddhist Studies at Lancaster University in England, as well as at Harvard and the University of Sri Lanka. The former executive director of IMS, he is currently the senior scholar at BCBS, and is editor of the Insight Journal.

  • Michael Rogan, PhD, MSW

    Michael Rogan, PhD, MSW is a therapist, research neuroscientist and a Buddhist practitioner for over 30 years.  After formative experiences with Zen traditions in the early 1980′s, he has focused on study and practice in Tibetan Buddhist traditions. He teaches meditation in both traditional and clinical settings, and trains clinicians in the integration of meditation techniques in health care. His research on the nature of emotion, learning and mental illness has been widely published, and he has been on the research faculties of the Columbia University Center for Neurobiology and Behavior, and the New York State Psychiatric Institute, where he continues to consult.  He also consults on program development for Friends in Deed, the crisis center for life-threatening illness. Currently, he spends most of his time as a therapist at community mental health clinics and the West Side Psychotherapy group.  His work is informed by insights from neuroscience and Buddhist theory of mind, as well as psychodynamic, cognitive and behavioral approaches.

  • Sharon Salzberg

    Sharon Salzberg is cofounder of the Insight Meditation Society (IMS) in Barre, Massachusetts. She is one of America’s leading spiritual teachers and authors, and has been a student of Buddhism since 1971, leading meditation retreats worldwide since 1974. Sharon’s latest book is The Force of Kindness, published by Sounds True. She is also the author of Faith: Trusting Your Own Deepest Experience, published by Riverhead Books; Lovingkindness: The Revolutionary Art of Happiness and A Heart as Wide as the World, both published by Shambhala Publications; and co-author with Joseph Goldstein of Insight Meditation, a Step-by-Step Course on How to Meditate (audio), from Sounds True. For more information about Sharon, please visit: www.SharonSalzberg.com.

  • Robert Schiller, MD, ABFP

    Robert (Red) Schiller is the Institute’s senior vice president for medical affairs and chairman of the Department of Family Medicine at Beth Israel Medical Center. Dr. Schiller, who joined the Institute in 1987, oversees the delivery of primary medical services across the Institute’s network of practices, develops quality improvement initiatives related to medical care, and directs the Beth Israel residency in Urban Family Practice, which the Institute co-sponsors with Beth Israel Medical Center. Dr. Schiller maintains an active patient care practice, and serves as chair of the Institute’s graduate medical education programs, the Institute’s Institutional Review Board for the Protection of Human Research Subjects, and Beth Israel’s Ethics Committee, Dr. Schiller is a practicing family physician certified by the American Board of Family Practice. Dr. Schiller attended the New York University School of Medicine. He completed his residency in family medicine at Montefiore Medical Center in the Bronx, where he also completed a one-year fellowship in family medicine. He has a professional interest in homeopathy, acupuncture, and other alternative therapies that complement conventional medical care. Dr. Schiller is the recipient of several awards including the Park-Davis Award for Teaching Medicine.

  • Morgan Stebbins, MDiv, LMSW, Certified Jungian Analyst, DMin Candidate

    Morgan Stebbins, LMSW, DMin, NCPsyA, Certified Jungian Analyst, is a Jungian Analyst with a practice both in Manhattan and also in the Cold Spring/Garrison, N.Y. area.  He was the Director of Training of the JPA (Jungian Psychoanalytic Association) and continues to serve as a faculty member of the C.G. Jung Foundation of New York.  Morgan began his ongoing Zen studies with Richard Baker Roshi at the San Francisco Zen Center in the late 70’s and was also a resident at their nearby monastery, Green Gulch Farm Zen Center.  His teaching integrates depth psychology with the wisdom of ancient traditions.  In his analytic practice, the meaning of archetypal symbols that arise in each person orients the direction of the work.

 

 

Pastoral Advisory Committee

The Pastoral Advisory Committee of the New York Zen Center for Contemplative Care is a group of interdisciplinary professional people used at regular intervals to provide advice and consultation on ourBuddhist CPE Chaplaincy Training Program planning, development and program evaluation. This helps insure our program is well integrated within the organization and provides feedback for quality assurance.

  • Rande Gail Brown

    Rande Gail Brown, LMSW, was a founding board member and formerly the Executive Director of the Tricycle Foundation, publisher of Tricycle: The Buddhist Review, America’s leading Buddhist magazine. With a degree in East Asian Studies from Princeton University, Rande lived for many years in Japan, where she was Associate Director of the International Division of the Institute for Religion and Psychology in Tokyo. Upon returning to the U.S., she founded East West Communications, a leading force in cross-cultural programming between Japan and the United States for over 20 years. A well-known translator of Japanese spiritual and cultural texts, Rande co-authored the New York Times bestseller Geisha, A Life with Mineko Iwasaki (Atria, 2002). Rande is a proud graduate of the first Foundations Course of the NYZCCC (2008). Her experience as a volunteer chaplain inspired her to become a licensed psychotherapist with a specific interest in the intersection of Buddhism, spirituality, and psychology.  She is currently a candidate in the Psychoanalytic Training Program of the William Alanson White Institute of Psychiatry, Psychoanalysis & Psychology.

  • Martin H. Ehrlich

    Dr. Ehrlich, MD, MPH, LAc, is board certified in Internal Medicine and licensed in acupuncture, with many years of experience in the practice and teaching of holistic, integrative medicine. He is a graduate of Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons and Columbia School of Public Health. He received certification in Acupuncture from The American College of Acupuncture and studied in China at The College of Traditional Chinese Medicine in Chengdu. He is certified in Functional Medicine and Clinical Homeopathy. He is an Assistant Professor of Medicine at The Albert Einstein College of Medicine. Dr. Ehrlich has been named “top doctor” by the Castle Connolly Health Care Provider Survey. He has written articles on hypertension and cardiovascular risk reduction and lectures on integrative approaches to common medical problems. He is the Medical Director of the Continuum Center for Health and Healing.

  • Marsha J. Handel, MLSMs

    Marsha J. Handel, MLSMs, has been a medical librarian at Beth Israel Medical Center for over twenty years, with a specialty in Integrative Medicine. She is co-author of the award winning book Alternative Medicine Resource Guide and has published articles, book chapters and taught professional-level classes on search techniques and resources in the field. Ms. Handel developed the Center’s educational web site and their first online continuing medical education course on the Integrative Approaches to IBS. She has co-created many health web sites, including the Addiction Recovery Guide, Healing Chronic Pain and Healing Digestive Disorders. In 2006 Ms. Handel received a 2 1/2 year NIH grant to develop a multimedia patient education web site on the Integrative Approach to Chronic Diseases: Heart Disease, Diabetes and Chronic Pain.

  • Emily Hartzog, MD

    Dr. Emily Hartzog M.D. is Board Certified in Obstetrics and Gynecology and a Fellow of the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology. She received her medical degree from the Medical University of South Carolina and completed her Internship and Residency at the New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center. Dr. Hartzog spent two years in England with the National Health Service, then returned for five years to the Indian Health Service in New Mexico. She spent the following twelve years in solo practice in the Four Corners region of the Southwest. She enjoyed taking care of a diverse population of patients, including Native Americans, ranchers, and people from the local surrounding communities.

    Dr. Hartzog is bilingual in English and Spanish and has spent much time in Mexico where she developed and currently operates a clinic for indigenous peoples in Patzcuaro, Michoacan. She highly values her work in cooperation with Traditional Healers and learning about medicinal plants. She is interested in a holistic approach to medicine and individualized care and is looking forward to integrating her clinical expertise with a wide range of healing approaches at the Center.

  • Jeanne Brennan Kenney, RN, BSN, HN-BC

    Jeanne Brennan Kenney, RN, BSN, HN-BC, is a board certified holistic nurse, who has practiced at the Continuum Center for Health and Healing for the past three years. Currently, Program Manager for the Urban Zen Integrative Therapy Program at Beth Israel Medical Center, she is responsible for launching and managing a program which is funded by the Urban Zen Initiative , that brings holistic healing modalities to Beth Israel’s oncology floor. Her previous work at the Center has been as the Research Coordinator for a program utilizing an integrative approach for the treatment of asthma symptoms in adults. Having worked for seven years on the NIH sponsored Women’s Health Initiative Reasearch Program, as the BI coordinator for the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, she realized the opportunity to engage in meaningful research in women’s health and disease prevention. In her previous career as a teacher at the United States Information Service schools, she lived and worked in Italy and France for six years and enjoyed travelling extensively throughout Europe. Upon return to the United States, she began a long career in the fashion industry, prior to realizing her long held desire to work in the medical field, incorporating holistic healing modalities for patients and families, with her traditional nursing training.

  • Roberta Anne Lee, MD

    Dr. Roberta Lee, MD, is Vice Chair of the Department of Integrative Medicine at Beth Israel Medical Center, one of the first Integrative Medicine Departments in an academic medical center. Her current departmental focus is to develop new interdisciplinary integrative medical initiatives. Dr. Lee recently completed a 7 year term as Medical Director at Beth Israel’s Center for Health and Healing (CCHH), a nationally acclaimed academic model for innovative health care that blends alternative and conventional medicine from a science-based perspective. Dr. Lee is a recognized expert on the use of alternative, integrative therapies and botanical supplements in optimizing wellness and managing chronic disease. She is currently developing new strategies for stress management that incorporate a unique blend of mind/body exercises, lifestyle changes and botanical supplements. Her book, The SuperStress Solution, will be published by Random House in the fall of 2009.For over ten years Dr. Lee has investigated the traditional use of medicinal plants in Micronesia, a collection of islands located in the Pacific basin. She serves as the ethnomedical specialist in a multidisciplinary team that includes botanists, ecologists and ethnobotany specialists from The New York Botanical Garden and the National Tropical Garden of Hawaii, Nature Conservancy. She recently became a member of the Board of Trustees on the American Botanical Council a non-profit organization that serves as an international information resource for scientific information on botanical supplements and ethnobotanical research.

  • Hanniel Levenson, MS, RYT

    Hanniel Levenson, MS, RYT, Born in Haifa, Israel, raised in New York City, Hanniel majored in Hebrew and Judaic Studies at New York University and was awarded a Master of Science degree in environmental policy at Bard College. A self-described post-denominational Jew, Hanniel sees a strong connection between the environment and Judaism and plans to pursue this avenue in his Rabbinical studies at The Academy for Jewish Religion. Hanniel is a Research Associate of Integrative Medicine at the Beth Israel Continuum Center for Health and Healing, and the Environmental Rabbinic intern at the Federation of Jewish Men’s Clubs. He passionately promotes green healthcare environments and patient-centered care, believing them to be crucial components to patient recovery. Hanniel teaches philosophy, prayer, and religion to various and eclectic groups in New York City including an alternative service as well as a learner’s group at a synagogue in Manhattan. He is also a painter, a competitive gymnast, who has competed on the national level, as well as a recently Registered Yoga Teacher.

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